Tag Archives: retail centers

Real estate finance expert joins Ian Black Real Estate team

via Tampa Bay Newswire

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George Kruse brings with him more than 20 years of real estate finance experience

SARASOTA, Fla. (Dec. 21, 2016) – Real estate finance executive George Kruse has joined the Ian Black Real Estate (IBRE) team as a Sales Associate in the firm’s Sarasota office. Kruse brings with him more than 20 years of experience on both the debt and equity sides of commercial investments. In addition to his role as a commercial broker, he will provide the IBRE team with guidance in value creation, financing opportunities and an understanding of the present debt and equity environments.

Kruse is also a Senior Managing Director at Osprey Capital, a Tampa-based commercial real estate finance company, specializing in the financing of value-add investment opportunities.

“We’re thrilled to welcome George to the team,” said Ian Black, partner at Ian Black Real Estate. “His experience on the financing side of the industry is a valuable add-on to our existing skill set and will go a long way in providing our clients with the highest level of service available.”

Leveraging Kruse’s expertise in the finance industry will allow the IBRE team to better assess opportunities for clients and maximize their investment potential.

Previously, Kruse spent more than seven years as the sole managing director of Vesta Equity, LLC, a private real estate investment fund based in Sarasota. Under his leadership, Vesta made over $200 million in small balance senior and equity investments nationwide. He also oversaw both the lending and investment divisions and structured the fund’s capital deployment strategies.

Prior to that, he served as an Investment Officer at CapitalSource Finance in both the New York and Orlando offices. At CapitalSource, Kruse was directly involved in over $600 million in commercial loan and hypothecation line transactions.

Kruse earned his bachelor’s degree in finance and management from the University of Florida and his Master of Business Administration from Columbia Business School. He recently obtained his Florida Real Estate license.

“It’s an honor to join the Ian Black team and put my experience in real estate finance to use in this side of the industry,” said Kruse. “I’m looking forward to starting my career as a commercial sales associate and working alongside such a strong team of brokers in the Sarasota market.”

Kruse is currently on the Advisory Board for the University of Florida’s Masters of Science in Real Estate (MSRE) program, as well as the Board of the Columbia University Club of Sarasota. He is a member of the International Council of Shopping Centers (ICSC) and the Sarasota Commercial Investment Division (CID), and is regularly asked to moderate and sit on panels about private commercial financing.

About Ian Black Real Estate
Ian Black Real Estate (IBRE) is a boutique commercial real estate brokerage firm located in Sarasota, Fla. The firm is one of the largest commercial brokerage firms in Southwest Florida and boasts a deep knowledge of the commercial real estate market in Sarasota and Manatee counties and the surrounding area. For more information, visit ian-black.com.

Click here for original press release

Mall-Oleums…

Remember when Malls were the place to go and for a while people avoided them because they were too crowded!

Can you recall when the walkways of malls were filled with Bustling Kiosks and shiny model cars?

Those days of successful franchises filling the spaces is long gone and malls are soon to Ghost Malls.

Wildfires

For the last 20 years, the American consumer has carried the burden of the world on its broad shoulders. A heavy yoke, to be sure, but one that steroids made lighter; the steroid of choice for American consumers was debt. Home equity loans, cash-out refinancing, credit-card debt, and auto loans. It’s been a wild ride, but the it’s over. The pseudo-wealth created over the last 20 years has begun to unwind, and will increase in speed in 2009.

A permanent psychological change has since occurred. American consumers have lost $30 trillion in value from their homes and investments in the last few years. No amount of fiscal stimulation will reverse this trauma, and the consumer’s subsequent retrenching will be felt from Des Moines to Shanghai. Consumer spending has accounted for 72% of GDP; it will revert to at least the long-term mean of 65%.

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David Rosenberg, the brilliant Merrill Lynch economist, describes it thus:

This is an epic event – the end of a 20-year secular credit expansion that went absolutely parabolic from 2001-2007.Before the US economy can truly begin to expand again, the savings rate must rise to pre-bubble levels of 8%, that the US housing stocks must fall to below 8 months’ supply, and that the household interest coverage ratio must fall from 14% to 10.5%. It’s important to note what sort of surgery that is going to require.

“We will probably have to eliminate $2 trillion of household debt to get there, this will happen either through debt being written off, as major financial institutions continue to do, or for consumers themselves to shrink their own balance sheets.”

There are at least 1.1 million retail stores in the US, according to the Census Bureau. There are approximately 1,100 malls, not counting thousands of strip centers. These numbers will be considerably lower by 2011.

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According to the ICSC, about 150,000 stores will shut down in 2009, in addition to the 150,000 that closed in 2008 and the 135,000 in 2007. Normally, 110,000 to 125,000 new stores open per year. At least 700,000 retail jobs will be lost; some major retailers that have closed or will close include: Circuit City (728 stores); Linens N Things (500 stores); Bombay Company (384 stores); Sharper Image (184 stores); Foot Locker (140 stores); Pacific Sunwear (153). Other large retailers are closing underperforming stores and scaling back expansions plans.

By 2011, at least 15% of the existing retail base will have gone to retail heaven. With the amount of vacant stores likely to reach in excess of 200,000 and vacancy rates for new malls already at 28%, there will be no need for new construction for many years.

Most of the retailers that are closing lease their locations from mall developers like General Growth Properties (GGP), Simon Property Group (SPG), Pennsylvania REIT (PEI) and Vornado Realty Trust (VNO). These developers will be hit by a quadruple whammy in 2009.
General Growth Properties added $4 billion of debt in the last 3 years, and is now teetering on the brink of bankruptcy. Simon Properties, which owns or operates 320 malls, added $3 billion of debt in the same period. Many smaller developers will be in even direr straits.

Many developers borrowed heavily to finance massive mall expansion. The term of these loans were generally 5 to 7 years. According to real-estate expert Andy Miller, the commercial collapse will be more rapid than the residential collapse:

“[You] may have 10 properties in a commercial pool that ultimately works its way into CDOs. Those loans are huge. You may have a shopping center loan in there for $25 million and an office building loan for $30 million dollars. As a result, if you have a default on just one of those loans, you can effectually wipe out all of the subordinate tranches.

“And that is why when you see the problems begin to appear on the commercial front, it’s going to be a much quicker sort of devolution than we saw on the residential side. In the commercial world, most of the financing that happened outside of the apartment business was done by conduits, and there are no more conduits left, and conduits were doing the stupidest loans you could find.

“They were doing an advertised 80% loan-to-value, which was usually more closely aligned to a 100% loan-to-value. They were dealing with no coverage. They were all non-recourse loans. Many of them were interest-only loans. Those loans are now gone. You can’t refinance them, and if you could, the terms would be onerous.”

FOR THE FULL ARTICLE…
Please visit… http://www.minyanville.com/articles/SHLD-jcp-spg-m-retail-Malls/index/a/20708

Circuit City says “Game Over”!

FRIDAY, JANUARY 16, 2009

Circuit City waives the white flag!
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By MICHAEL FELBERBAUM and VINNEE TONG, AP Business Writers

Circuit City Stores Inc., the nation’s second-biggest consumer electronics retailer, said Friday it had run out of options and will be forced to liquidate its 567 U.S. stores. The closures could send another 30,000 people into the ranks of the unemployed.

“This is the only possible path for our company,” James A. Marcum, acting chief executive, said in a statement. “We are extremely disappointed by this outcome.”

The company had been seeking a buyer or a deal to refinance its debt, but the hobbled credit market and consumer worries proved insurmountable. And bleak holiday sales results further weakened even the stronger retailers.

Circuit City said in court papers it has appointed Great American Group LLC, Hudson Capital Partners LLC, SB Capital Group LLC and Tiger Capital Group LLC as liquidators.

“Regrettably for the more than 30,000 employees of Circuit City and our loyal customers, we were unable to reach an agreement with our creditors and lenders,” Marcum said.

Shareholders are likely to receive nothing, as is typical in bankruptcy cases. It was unclear what would happen to the company’s 765 retail stores and dealer outlets in Canada.

Circuit City filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in November as vendors started to restrict the flow of merchandise ahead of the busy holiday shopping season.

It had been exploring strategic alternatives since May, when it opened its books to Blockbuster Inc. The Dallas-based movie-rental chain made a takeover bid of more than $1 billion with plans to create a 9,300-store chain to sell electronic gadgets and rent movies and games. Blockbuster withdrew the bid in July because of market conditions.

Circuit City, which said it had $3.4 billion in assets and $2.32 billion in liabilities as of Aug. 31, said in its initial filings that it planned to emerge from court protection in the first half of this year.

Under court protection, Circuit City has broken 150 leases at locations where it no longer operates stores. The company already closed 155 stores in the U.S. in November and December.

U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Kevin Huennekens had given the company permission to liquidate if a buyout was not achieved.

The liquidation is the latest big blow to the nation’s malls, which have suffered from a rise in vacancies as a slew of chains from Mervyns LLC to Linens ‘N Things have liquidated. But analysts say that the demise of Circuit City, whose stores range in size from 20,000 to 25,000 square feet, will hurt the fortunes of mall operators even more.

“It will bring to market a glut of big box spaces across the country,” said John Bemis, head of Jones Lang LaSalle Inc.’s retail leasing team. “It will have one of the largest impacts on big box real estate across the country.”
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AP Retail Writer Anne D’Innocenzio contributed to this report.