Tag Archives: nutrition

Week 2 recap – Journey back to health

Week 2 recap – Journey back to health

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Pic from the past – Back in 2011 when I was near my leanest and in top shape!

The past week has been a tough week.  As in life, things at work or at home arent always copacetic and this week had a bit of resistance in all those areas.  This naturally affected my workouts and at the end of the day, my eating.

Mind you, I stayed quite diligent in eating reasonably well, such as a quest bar as a snack or bringing a banana to work in addition to a snack as I knew I would be hungry.  I find myself a bit hungrier on the mornings I hit the gym.

The good news is, even with some later dinners and additional days with caloric intake near 2,200 total, I still managed only 1 Lenny & Larrys Protein cookie and was able to drink a solid amount of water.  At least 64 ounces per day if not closer to 100.  My goal for week 5 and thereafter is 128 ounces per day.

The best part of the chaos is being able to focus and hit the gym again.  Those mornings at the gym are wonderful and I leave there feeling like I got some good work in.

I’m looking forward to week 3 and surprising my wife in Clewiston, FL as she runs her first 50 mile race at the Skydive Ultra!  Can’t wait to see the look on her face when she see’s my sister, brother-in-law and myself cheering her on!

 

The Perfect Workout For 40+: Triathlon Training

The Perfect Workout For 40+: Triathlon Training

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By Jenna Bergen

Research and writing by Lara Rosenbaum

There are plenty of things to love about getting older—you’ve learned to appreciate the little things (a purring cat on your lap, the first strawberry of summer, comfortable heels that go with everything), you’ve made peace with your faults (or at least most of them), and you can eat dessert before dinner and no one is going to say you can’t. But the wisdom of age also brings another inevitability: “Bodies change as we age,” says physiologist Tom Holland, C.S.C.S., author of The 12-Week Triathlete. Hormone levels change, and you naturally lose metabolism-revving muscle mass starting around age 30—about half a pound a year. As a result, metabolism slows, making weight gain easier. (Click Here <—=== For some nutrition products to help maintain healthy living)

One of the best ways to stay fit and injury-free in your 30s, 40s, and beyond is one many women have already discovered: triathlons—a race where you swim, bike, and run, one sport immediately following the other. Nearly 40% of triathletes are now women, and female participation has jumped 10% over the last decade, according to USA Triathlon. What’s more, the largest membership increase is within the 30 to 49 age groups, and the average triathlon participant is 38.

Why the buzz? “It’s essentially forced cross-training,” Holland explains.

Ready to follow Donovan’s lead? Here are a few things you need to know about triathlons before you get started:

* Make your first race a sprint triathlon. This is the shortest distance—usually a half-mile swim, 12-mile bike, and 3-mile run. Most beginners will finish the race in about 2 hours.
The average training plan for a sprint triathlon lasts about 6 to 8 weeks.

* You don’t have to invest in a ton of fancy equipment. You can ride any working bike—yes, even a mountain bike or beach cruiser. Many local bike shops will rent you a bike for a day.

(Click Here <—=== For some nutrition products to help maintain healthy living)

If triathlon was easy, they'd call it football!

If triathlon was easy, they’d call it football!

For the complete article and additional tips, CLICK HERE <———-============

THE MANSOME GUIDE TO JUICING & supplement & nutrtion products

THE MANSOME GUIDE TO JUICING

Dreznin's Find your fit challenge Feast

Dreznin’s Find your fit challenge Feast

Click Here ======———> For Video and recipe breakdown http://screen.yahoo.com/mansome-233-mansome-guide-juicing-040000001.html

Also try some of these supplements to get your recommended nutritional intake.

Isotonix® OPC-3®

Multivitamin

Optimal Wellness Kit – (On Sale)

Join us Tonight!! Monday, June 17th at 7:00pm for a “Wellness 101 PARTY!”

Join us Tonight!! Monday, June 17th at 7:00pm for a “Wellness 101 PARTY!”

We are all faced with health challenges at some point in our lives. Nothing is more important to us than our health.

We would like to invite you to our PARTY!
• Taste some samples (Enjoy a Nutritional Shake)
• Learn about better nutrition & listening to your body
• Learn how you can FEEL BETTER and LIVE LONGER
• Have FUN!!

Hosted by:
Samuel Aguilar – Jonell Romanus -Tony Romanus

4401 McIntosh Park Drive #8, Sarasota, FL 34232

Date: Monday, June 17th Time: 7:00 p.m.
Phone: 941-400-0279

The Unexpected Antidote to Procrastination

The Unexpected Antidote to Procrastination

The antidote to procrastination

The antidote to procrastination


–by Peter Bregman, Original Story, Jun 13, 2013

A recent early morning hike in Malibu, California, led me to a beach, where I sat on a rock and watched surfers. I marveled at these courageous men and women who woke before dawn, endured freezing water, paddled through barreling waves, and even risked shark attacks, all for the sake of, maybe, catching an epic ride.

After about 15 minutes, it was easy to tell the surfers apart by their style of surfing, their handling of the board, their skill, and their playfulness.

What really struck me though, was what they had in common. No matter how good, how experienced, how graceful they were on the wave, every surfer ended their ride in precisely the same way: By falling.

Some had fun with their fall, while others tried desperately to avoid it. And not all falls were failures — some fell into the water only when their wave fizzled and their ride ended.

But here’s what I found most interesting: The only difference between a failure and a fizzle was the element of surprise. In all cases, the surfer ends up in the water. There’s no other possible way to wrap up a ride.

That got me thinking: What if we all lived life like a surfer on a wave?

The answer that kept coming to me was that we would take more risks.

That difficult conversation with your boss (or employee, or colleague, or partner, or spouse) that you’ve been avoiding? You’d initiate it.

That proposal (or article, or book, or email) you’ve been putting off? You’d start it.

That new business (or product, or sales strategy, or investment) you’ve been overanalyzing? You’d follow through.

And when you fell — because if you take risks, you will fall — you’d get back on the board and paddle back into the surf. That’s what every single one of the surfers did.

So why don’t we live life that way? Why don’t we accept falling — even if it’s a failure — as part of the ride?

Because we’re afraid of feeling.

Think about it: In all those situations, our greatest fear is that we will feel something unpleasant.

What if you have that scary conversation you’ve been avoiding and it ends the relationship? It would hurt.

What if you follow through on the business idea and lose money? It would feel terrible.

What if you submitted the proposal and you were rejected? It would feel awful.

Here’s the thing: More often than not, our fear doesn’t help us avoid the feelings; it simply subjects us to them for an agonizingly long time. We feel the suffering of procrastination, or the frustration of a stuck relationship. I know partnerships that drag along painfully for years because no one is willing to speak about the elephant in the room. Taking risks, and falling, is not something to avoid. It’s something to cultivate. But how?

Practice.

….

Soon, you won’t fear feeling. You’ll pursue it like those courageous early morning surfers. You’ll wake up before dawn and dive into those scary conversations and difficult proposals. You’ll take the risks that once scared you. And you’ll fall; sometimes you’ll even fail.

Then you’ll get up and do it again.

For the complete story, CLICK HERE <—————–

Peter Bregman is a strategic advisor to CEOs and their leadership teams.