Tag Archives: marketing

Ad agency with nearly $15M in sales finds buyer

April 13, 2017

LAKEWOOD RANCH —One of the largest advertising, marketing and public relations firms in the Sarasota-Bradenton region, Grapevine Communications, has a new owner.

The founders, husband-wife team Angela Massaro-Fain and John Fain, had been working on an exit strategy for close to five years, says Massaro-Fain. They rejected at least two suitors. Then they found the right fit close by in Allison Imre Perkowski — a former sales rep and event promoter for iHeartMedia and iHeartRadio in Sarasota.

Imre Perkowski, 39, assisted Lakewood Ranch-based Grapevine at the radio station for ad placements, and she and Massaro-Fain have known each other for a decade. Massaro-Fain will remain with the company, on the board and as creative director. John Fain will remain with the firm on a short-term adviser contract. Financial terms of the deal, which took a year to come together, weren’t disclosed.

“It was really important that we sold it to someone I trust,” says Massaro-Fain, “and someone with a vision to grow Grapevine.”

Grapevine had $14.33 million in revenues in 2016, up 3.6% from $13.81 million in 2015. Founded in 2002, it has 15 employees. The firm’s clients vary widely, and include law offices, nonprofits, real estate firms and senior living developers. Grapevine also has a large portfolio of area “Best of” awards from local publications.

Often with a firm of that size and stature, a bigger out-of-town company will buy it to gain entry into a new a market. And Massaro-Fain says the two potential buyers she and John Fain rejected fit that mold. “We didn’t want to grow geographically and we didn’t want someone who didn’t know our brand,” Massaro-Fain tells the Business Observer in an interview.

For complete article and others, CLICK HERE <——–

270+ Tools 4 running a Business Online

This article is packed with so much content and so many suggestions and links, that I am simply going to utilize an introductory paragraph and a link to full article, because in hindsight, you may set aside a block of time.

“Last August we featured a post with more than 230 online apps for running your business. Since there are hundreds of new apps coming on the market every year, we figured it was time for an update. This year we came up with more than 270 additional apps. Some are completely new since last year, others might have been overlooked, and still others made significant improvements that gained them a spot on the list.”

Click here for Full Story

The above article was on Mashable and written by Cameron Chapman

30 topics to focus on in your blog

“Should we have a property blog?”

Blogging isn’t for everyone, but I think there are lots of reasons why the answer is absolutely YES.

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If you have a property blog, or if you’ve thought about writing one, but don’t think you have enough ideas to write about, here are 30 ideas to get you started:

1. How to get the most from our property management team.
2. Recommend an improvement to our community.
3. What kinds of community events would interest you most?
4. Exciting updates or changes coming in future months.
5. How to decorate a small space.

6. Upcoming events, coupons and offers for the next two weeks.
7. A little bit about us.
8. Best kept secrets in our neighborhood.
9. Best place to get a beer, find home accessories, watch the fireworks, etc.
10. Photos from this month’s community party or meetup.
11. Video: A day in the life of our service technicians. (You could also post this on your Careers page.)
12. Our residents rock!
13. We support these causes/non-profits, and here’s why.
14. Tips to lower your utility bills. (You could interview someone from the local utility company.)
15. Have you seen our community garden, dog park, fitness room, whatever.
16. How we handle your disputes or complaints.
17. Anything that builds on a recent piece in your resident newsletter. (Use this both ways — promote recent blog posts in your newsletter.)
18. How to handle a difficult neighbor.
19. Can you recommend a better process for this?
20. We’re sorry, and here’s how we’ll handle things next time.
21. Report from our resident community review board.
22. We hate to see you go, but if you have to leave, here are some tips when preparing for move-out. (Too much?)
23. Need to talk to us? Friend us on Facebook (or Myspace, or Twitter or… You get the point.)

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Click on link below picture of city for original story.

Mall-Oleums…

Remember when Malls were the place to go and for a while people avoided them because they were too crowded!

Can you recall when the walkways of malls were filled with Bustling Kiosks and shiny model cars?

Those days of successful franchises filling the spaces is long gone and malls are soon to Ghost Malls.

Wildfires

For the last 20 years, the American consumer has carried the burden of the world on its broad shoulders. A heavy yoke, to be sure, but one that steroids made lighter; the steroid of choice for American consumers was debt. Home equity loans, cash-out refinancing, credit-card debt, and auto loans. It’s been a wild ride, but the it’s over. The pseudo-wealth created over the last 20 years has begun to unwind, and will increase in speed in 2009.

A permanent psychological change has since occurred. American consumers have lost $30 trillion in value from their homes and investments in the last few years. No amount of fiscal stimulation will reverse this trauma, and the consumer’s subsequent retrenching will be felt from Des Moines to Shanghai. Consumer spending has accounted for 72% of GDP; it will revert to at least the long-term mean of 65%.

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David Rosenberg, the brilliant Merrill Lynch economist, describes it thus:

This is an epic event – the end of a 20-year secular credit expansion that went absolutely parabolic from 2001-2007.Before the US economy can truly begin to expand again, the savings rate must rise to pre-bubble levels of 8%, that the US housing stocks must fall to below 8 months’ supply, and that the household interest coverage ratio must fall from 14% to 10.5%. It’s important to note what sort of surgery that is going to require.

“We will probably have to eliminate $2 trillion of household debt to get there, this will happen either through debt being written off, as major financial institutions continue to do, or for consumers themselves to shrink their own balance sheets.”

There are at least 1.1 million retail stores in the US, according to the Census Bureau. There are approximately 1,100 malls, not counting thousands of strip centers. These numbers will be considerably lower by 2011.

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According to the ICSC, about 150,000 stores will shut down in 2009, in addition to the 150,000 that closed in 2008 and the 135,000 in 2007. Normally, 110,000 to 125,000 new stores open per year. At least 700,000 retail jobs will be lost; some major retailers that have closed or will close include: Circuit City (728 stores); Linens N Things (500 stores); Bombay Company (384 stores); Sharper Image (184 stores); Foot Locker (140 stores); Pacific Sunwear (153). Other large retailers are closing underperforming stores and scaling back expansions plans.

By 2011, at least 15% of the existing retail base will have gone to retail heaven. With the amount of vacant stores likely to reach in excess of 200,000 and vacancy rates for new malls already at 28%, there will be no need for new construction for many years.

Most of the retailers that are closing lease their locations from mall developers like General Growth Properties (GGP), Simon Property Group (SPG), Pennsylvania REIT (PEI) and Vornado Realty Trust (VNO). These developers will be hit by a quadruple whammy in 2009.
General Growth Properties added $4 billion of debt in the last 3 years, and is now teetering on the brink of bankruptcy. Simon Properties, which owns or operates 320 malls, added $3 billion of debt in the same period. Many smaller developers will be in even direr straits.

Many developers borrowed heavily to finance massive mall expansion. The term of these loans were generally 5 to 7 years. According to real-estate expert Andy Miller, the commercial collapse will be more rapid than the residential collapse:

“[You] may have 10 properties in a commercial pool that ultimately works its way into CDOs. Those loans are huge. You may have a shopping center loan in there for $25 million and an office building loan for $30 million dollars. As a result, if you have a default on just one of those loans, you can effectually wipe out all of the subordinate tranches.

“And that is why when you see the problems begin to appear on the commercial front, it’s going to be a much quicker sort of devolution than we saw on the residential side. In the commercial world, most of the financing that happened outside of the apartment business was done by conduits, and there are no more conduits left, and conduits were doing the stupidest loans you could find.

“They were doing an advertised 80% loan-to-value, which was usually more closely aligned to a 100% loan-to-value. They were dealing with no coverage. They were all non-recourse loans. Many of them were interest-only loans. Those loans are now gone. You can’t refinance them, and if you could, the terms would be onerous.”

FOR THE FULL ARTICLE…
Please visit… http://www.minyanville.com/articles/SHLD-jcp-spg-m-retail-Malls/index/a/20708